TAMALES ELSEWHERE

Hello there!

Since we've gotten started with GUUDBELLY, there's been a lot of confusion and non-belief among a LOT of people about where our tamales originate from.......

AND the 100% honest truth is "Inside Our Heads". Vic has never studied any sort of culinary arts anywhere ever. He taught himself to cook from a young age & to this day experiments with different ingredients and flavors without consulting a single resource. 

And me, on the other hand, made tamales for the very first time EVER IN MY LIFE last summer(July 2015), in which my only resources were 2 different banana leaf tamale recipes online -- which of course we're modified to be vegan.

People's minds are blown away by the idea that one day last year the two of us tried something new, made a FB page and just like that "hit the jackpot" -- Throw in 10+ months of hard work, and that's literally the way it happened.

 

ANYWHOO.. BACK TO WHAT I CAME HERE TO SHARE WITH YOU 😁

 

We constantly have customers with family from Mexico and other places abroad tell us our food reminds them of home. Whether its the aesthetic or flavors, we get asked about our process or if either of our families originate from South American countries like Columbia, Guatemala, or Belize.  Once we had someone ask if my "mother-in-law taught me how to make tamales". I interpreted the question initially as an insult until I realized what she truly implied -- OUR FOOD IS THE SHIT. Since then Ive been fairly loud and proud about our story and the amount of effort that goes into our food. Because really, why not?

A place we've been hearing the name of a lot is a southern Mexican city called Oaxaca, where banana leaf is primarily used for tamales. Vic and I are all about learning and discovering more efficient ways of growing ourselves and our business. After snooping a Oaxaca-based episode of Anthony Bourdain's Parts Unknown, we've juggled the idea of traveling to Mexico to do just that. --  We have no idea what we would eat there, outside of raw fruit, but there's so much culture and technique that goes into their food, its unbelievable how much there would be to learn. 

Not too long ago, I found a company called Naive Slow Fashion based out of Oaxaca that seems to work with the rural community to make hand-made and hand-dyed textiles, fabrics, and goods. You can find them on Instagram at @naiveslowfashion. They have an Etsy account HERE where you can peep & purchase their products. AND In the midst of photos of looms and people walking through streets and markets, I found these beauties:

 

 

THE RESEMBLANCE IS INCREDIBLE

(Of course, what they're making is in no way vegan, but the visual similarity of their process and cooking space to our isn't very far off )

 

 

Anywhoo, all of that reading was just to show you these photos and teach you something new about somewhere different in the world 👀🌎 Now its back to GUUDBELLY.. Come visit us tomorrow night for some #Guud eats from 6p-10p at:

The RailYard Neighborhood Bar
4206 San Felipe St.
Houston,TX 77027

✌🏽